Crisis Communication:
A National Study of Leadership During the Financial Crisis
© 2009 - Ruby A. Rouse, PhD & Rich S. Schuttler, PhD
Historical Overview

The foundation for the NRC study of leadership during the financial crisis began several years ago. Below is a summary of the events leading to the study.

 

2007

         Dr. Richard S. Schuttler began work on the Laws of Communication: The intersection where leadership meets employee performance. The book's content focused on a stoplight metaphor to categorize organizational communication into red, yellow, and green performance zones.

 

2008

        In collaboration with Schuttler, Dr. Ruby A. Rouse developed the Supervisor Communication Inventory (SCI).

        Two tests of the SCI were conducted. The first study used a statewide sample of senior healthcare leaders in Indiana; the second examined interacting employees and supervisors at a large California hospital.

         Two independent subject matter expert panels analyzed the validity of the SCI. Results indicated the instrument measured two constructs: supervisor leadership and communication. As a result, the instrument was renamed the Supervisor Leadership and Communication Inventory (SLCI).

        Rouse and Schuttler submitted a faculty research proposal to the University of Phoenixís National Research Center (NRC), suggesting the SLCI should be used to evaluate leadership during the financial crisis of 2008-2009.

 

2009

        Schuttlerís book, the Laws of Communication, was published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

        Rouse and Schuttler received a NRC faculty research grant for 2009.

         In June 2009, data collection for the study began.

         In alignment with the University of Phoenixís School of Advanced Studies, Rouse and Schuttler develop a Scholar-Practitioner-Leader (SPL) website to allow interested researchers to participate ethnographically in a doctoral research process.

 

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